Animal Care

HEALTHY PETS DISCLAIMER: This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your own veterinarian or doctor. The English bulldog, for example, is going through a resurgence in popularity, whereas purebred dogs are no longer preferred. There has also been an increase on dogs being rescued from shelters. These trends, Herzog says, are similar to trends you might see in fashion cycles. Don’t keep undomesticated animals as house pets. Typically, airlines require pet health certificates that are no older than 10 days, even if the receiving country accepts an older one. Some countries, however, require a health certificate to be even less than 10 days. This is an important point to check.

Johnson RA (2011). Animal-assisted interventions in health care contexts. In McCardle P, McCune S, Griffin JA & Maholmes V (Eds.), How animals affect us (pp. 183-192). Washington D.C.: American Psychological Association. Service animals are categorized as animals trained to do a specific task for their owner. The most common example is a guide dog. Service animals are allowed in public accommodations because of the owner’s need for the animal at all times.

Travellers’ point of entry – the pet animal (dog, cat or ferret) must pass through a travellers’ point of entry designated by Member States (see below). The owner must, at the time of entry, contact the competent authority present at the point of entry for the purposes of the documentary and identity checks. Pets love us unconditionally. They’re also great for our health — mentally and physically. Caring for pets can boost self-esteem , prevent loneliness, and even lower heart rate and blood pressure in some people.

olfdogs have also grown in popularity as pets but are not much different from their pure wolf cousins, therefore, they too should be avoided. Animal Medical Clinic posts regular articles about how to keep your pets happy and healthy. Animal Friends of the Valleys is dedicated to promoting humane care of animals through education and a humane, proactive animal services program. We are committed to preventing the suffering of animals and to ending pet overpopulation in the cities we serve.

Our goals for this paper are twofold: (1) Describe how pet owners and non-pet owners differ. (2) Describe why this difference needs to be accounted for in observational research on pet ownership and health. In this paper, we will examine the factors associated with pet ownership to provide empirical evidence about how dog and cat owners differ from the general population. We also describe how these differences are also associated with health outcomes, which may lead researchers to under- or over-estimate the impact of pet ownership on health in any observational studies that do not use suitable statistical controls. We then provide guidance into how to strengthen the research basis, recommending some recent methodological innovations that help overcome the limitations associated with selection bias.