House Pets

Before pets can be imported to New Zealand, they need to meet health requirements. The most common pets are dogs, cats, rabbits and rodents. But some people keep more exotic animals. Not all animals are suitable as pets. Wild animals, for example, may suffer in a domestic environment or they may be dangerous. Dogs that have never been vaccinated against rabies must be vaccinated at least 30 days before arrival. Adult dogs older than 15 months of age that previously received a rabies vaccination given no earlier than 3 months of age and that has since expired may be imported immediately after booster vaccination, without the need to wait 30 days.

The pet-keeping habit often runs in families: this was once ascribed to children coming to imitate their parents’ lifestyles when they leave home, but recent research has suggested that it also has a genetic basis. Some people, whatever their upbringing, seem predisposed to seek out the company of animals, others less so. Nashvillians love their pets, whether they are dogs, cats or backyard hens. The Metro Health Department’s Animal Control Division has information on programs for promoting responsible pet ownership, pet adoptions and enforcing animal control ordinances.

Please be sure that when buying any small animal for yourself or your children you always use a reputable breeder. Make sure the animals have been sexed properly and are of the right age to leave their mothers. Never buy animals from pet shops unwilling to spend time with you making sure you understand the commitment being taken on. Common domesticated animals that can make good family pets include cats, dogs, rabbits, birds, and fish. But be careful about labeling a certain animal or breed as unquestionably safe. There are exceptions to every rule, and any animal may scratch or bite if put in a dangerous situation.

CDC strongly encourages dog owners to have their dogs vaccinated against rabies before arriving in the United States and travel with a copy of their valid rabies vaccination certificate. CDC regulations serve to protect you, your dogs, and your community. Rabies is a serious disease, and there is no cure. We recognise the important role pets play in the lives of their owners, the families they live with and, through positive social interactions, the local community.

Vaccination against rabies is compulsory. It is possible from the age of 12 weeks, but your pet shall be identified. If needed, the veterinarian can still carry out the identification process shortly before vaccination and deliver a European passport. The Animal Welfare Act establishes requirements concerning the transportation, sale, and handling of certain animals and includes restrictions on the importation of dogs for purposes of resale, prohibitions on animal fighting ventures, and provisions intended to prevent the theft of personal pets.