Mpi

A pet or companion animal is an animal kept primarily for a person’s company, protection, or entertainment rather than as a working animal , livestock , or laboratory animal Popular pets are often noted for their attractive appearances, intelligence , and relatable personalities. There’s a final twist to this story: recent studies have shown that affection for pets goes hand-in-hand with concern for the natural world. It seems that people can be roughly divided into those that feel little affinity for animals or the environment, and those who are predisposed to delight in both, adopting pet-keeping as one of the few available outlets in today’s urbanised society.

Also, we used to live with a lot of people in our houses‚ÄĒgrandparents and parents and cousins. Now you have a lot of people living just as couples without kids, you have empty nesters, you have huge divorce rates, people living by themselves. There’s a real emptiness in our homes that cats and dogs have filled. This isn’t fringe behavior to treat a pet like a member of the family. It’s not the crazy cat lady or the crazy dog person. It’s society.

Pets provide their owners (or “guardians” 1 ) both physical and emotional benefits. Walking a dog can provide both the human and the dog with exercise, fresh air, and social interaction Pets can give companionship to people who are living alone or elderly adults who do not have adequate social interaction with other people. There is a medically approved class of therapy animals , mostly dogs or cats, that are brought to visit confined humans, such as children in hospitals or elders in nursing homes Pet therapy utilizes trained animals and handlers to achieve specific physical, social, cognitive or emotional goals with patients.

Modern life is stressful and high levels of anxiety can lead to numerous health problems. Luckily, pets can really help us relax – stroking your cat or simply watching fish swim around in a tank can make your worries melt away. Previous studies have proven that pet owners tend to have lower blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride levels than people who don’t own a pet. That means having a furry pal can decrease the chances of suffering a heart attack later in life.

We carried out a study with Cats Protection in 2011 which involved over 600 cat- and non-cat-owning respondents, with half of them describing themselves as currently having a mental health problem. The survey found that 87% of people who owned a cat felt it had a positive impact on their wellbeing, while 76% said they could cope with everyday life much better thanks to the company of their feline friends.