Travelling With Pets

Explore Animal Planet’s library of pet content for cute videos, pet health articles, our dog and cat breed selectors and much more. Microchip scanner: While you can take a pet to a local veterinarian to have it scanned for a microchip, not all veterinarians have a universal microchip scanner and therefore cannot scan for all different microchip types. The Seattle Animal Shelter thoroughly scans each animal upon intake with a universal scanner, which reads most, if not all, microchips in use.

Pets for Patriots aims to get harder-to-adopt pets out of shelters while offering free memberships to U.S. veterans and incentives to help them care for their new pet. The organization has a network of shelters their members can use to find their perfect pet, and they pre-screen members before they visit shelters to make sure they’ll be good pet parents.

Show animals require extra care, grooming and training. If you’re considering such an animal, you should be prepared to take on a major commitment. The rewards of owning such an animal are numerous, but so are the costs and responsibilities. The Transition Center advises pet owners to review carefully their travel plans for upcoming international moves. Whether returning to the United States or moving overseas, pet owners need to determine an airline carrier’s pet policies on live animals as excess baggage, cargo, and in-cabin before booking your pet.

Pets can be taught to do tricks by using the Animal Whistle. You can even train them when they’re inside the farm house. Once a day you will earn affection for using the whistle with the tamed pet, and eventually the difficulty of the trick performed will increase. High level tricks are good for winning the Pet Contest at the Animal Festival on Spring 28.

One-stop shop: The Seattle Animal Shelter is the only shelter for the city. This means that if someone has lost his or her pet within or near city limits, he or she will come here to look. While photographs are helpful, they are no replacement for seeing the animal in person. Bringing the pet here greatly increases its chances of being reunited. Serpell JA (2011). Historical and cultural perspectives on human-pet interactions. In McCardel P, McCune S, Griffin JA, et al, Animals in Our Lives (pp. 7-22). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.